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DISTRIBUTED mode used in the batch architecture has been deprecated in Oracle Utilities Application Framework V4.3.x (Doc ID 2135738.1)

Last updated on DECEMBER 04, 2019

Applies to:

Oracle Utilities Customer Care and Billing - Version 2.5.0.1.0 to 2.5.0.1.0 [Release 2.5]
Oracle Utilities Framework - Version 4.3.0.0.1 to 4.3.0.2.0 [Release 4.3]
Oracle Utilities Customer to Meter Base
Oracle Utilities Advanced Meter Solution
Oracle Utilities Meter Data Management - Version 2.2.0.0.0 and later
Information in this document applies to any platform.

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**Examples provided in this article do not represent real life personal/confidential information**

**Disclaimer:** This KM article may include the following abbreviations:

WKA - Well Known Addresses

Based upon feedback from partners and customers, the DISTRIBUTED mode used in the batch architecture has been deprecated in Oracle Utilities Application Framework V4.3.x and above.

The DISTRIBUTED mode was originally introduced to the batch cluster architecture back in Oracle Utilities Application Framework V2.x and was popular but suffered from a number of restrictions.

Given the flexibility of the batch architect was expanded in newer releases it was decided to deprecate the DISTRIBUTED mode to encourage more effective use of the architecture.

 

Actions

 It is recommended that customers using this mode migrate to CLUSTERED mode using a few techniques:

For customers on non-production environments, it is recommended to use CLUSTERED mode using the single server (ss) template used by the Batch Edit facility. This is a simple cluster that uses CLUSTERED mode without the advanced configurations in a clustered environment. It is restricted to single host servers so it is not typically recommended for production or clustered environments that use more than one host server.
For customers on production environments, it is recommended to use CLUSTERED mode with the unicast (wka) template used by the Batch Edit facility. This will allow flexible configuration without the use of multi-cast which can be an issue on some implementations using CLUSTERED mode. The advantage of Batch Edit is that it has a simple interface to allow you to define this configuration without too much fuss.

The advantage of Batch Edit when building your new batch configurations is that it is a simple to use as well as it generates an optimized set of configuration files that can be used directly for the batch architecture. Execution of the jobs would have to remove the DISTRIBUTED tags on the command lines or configuration files to use the new architecture.

Customers should read the Batch Best Practices (<Note 836362.1>) and the Server Administration Guide shipped with your product for advice on Batch Edit as well as the templates mentioned in this article.

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