Creating a Physical Standby database using DBCA duplicate (Doc ID 2283697.1)

Last updated on JULY 21, 2017

Applies to:

Oracle Database - Enterprise Edition - Version 12.2.0.1 to 12.2.0.1 [Release 12.2]
Information in this document applies to any platform.

Goal

Maximum Availability Architecture

The Maximum Availability Architecture (MAA) defines Oracle’s most comprehensive architecture for reducing downtime for scheduled outages as well as preventing, detecting and recovering from unscheduled outages. Real Application Clusters (RAC) and Oracle Data Guard are integral components of the Database MAA reference architectures and solutions.

More detailed information, such as a discussion of the purpose of MAA and the benefits it provides, can be found on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN) at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/features/availability/maa-096107.html

Purpose of this Document

The purpose of this document is to provide a step-by-step guide for creating a standby database using DBCA in an Oracle Database 12.2 environment integrating the MAA Oracle Data Guard configuration best practices. This paper assumes that the following conditions exist:

  1. A Primary single instance database utilizing ASM for data file storage
  2. The Primary database is in archive log mode
  3. Password and Spfile are stored in ASM.
  4. The target Standby host has all the required Oracle software installed and configured.
  5. The Standby target database storage will utilize ASM.
  6. The standby target resides in a separate system.
  7. If role separation is used in your environment set the environment based on the roles with oracle or grid. In our example The oracle user owns both grid and oracle software installations.

 

NOTE: The DBCA duplicate command in this release can only create a single instance standby database from single instance primary database. It does not support RAC or multitenant configurations.


Supported Versions

 

Multiple Channels Consideration:

Performing a DBCA duplicate and using multiple channels on the primary node can significantly improve performance. If the Primary database is a RAC use multiple RMAN channels spread across the primary nodes. This utilizes more network interfaces for the data transfer.

Parallelize backups across all primary database nodes leveraging disk and network bandwidth as available. MAA best practice recommend using 8 channels minimum or 2 channels per node.

Use automatic load balancing to distribute RMAN channels among the allocated nodes. Analyze the impact on existing production databases and reduce the RMAN parallelism if necessary.

Make the following RMAN configuration changes at the primary database. Our example uses 4 preconfigured channels for RMAN to use during the standby creation step. These 4 channels will suffice for single node but can be increased if the server has additional capacity.

 

 

All of the examples illustrated in this document use the following naming:

Databases and Hosts Used in this example

 

Primary

Standby

Hosts

exa503

exa504

Database Unique Name

chicago

boston

Instance names

chicago

boston

Solution

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